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November 22, 2011     The Hinton News
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November 22, 2011
 

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o q ! The,HINTON NEWS (Continuing the Hinton Daily News & The Weekend Leader) Home of "W. Va. Water Festival" Volume 109 No. 32 Hinton, West Virginia Tuesday Nov. 22, 2011 50 Cents Work has begun on the John Henry Historical Park. The above photo shows heavy equipment in place where construction of the entrance way, "the door to the park" as some call it, is taking place. Photo by John Farm// A visit to West Virginia By Peggy Noonan Origanally published in the Wall Street Journal It's summer, the country's traveling, and the great pleasure to be had from leaving home is meeting and falling in love with a place : yu've neve been to. I end that sentence with a preposition to segue into my favorite story this summer of cultural tensions and differences as navigated by two American women. A Southern lady sees a vacationing society lady from the Northeast. The Southern lady is gregarious: "Where y'all from?" Saciety lady is put off: "rm from a place where they don't end sentences with a preposition? Southern lady smiles, nods her head: "Beg your pardon. Where y'all from, bitch?" It's fun to see cultures collide, because that's one of the ways you know they still exist. America continues to be full of differentness, in spite of the samening effect of national media. (I made up samening. It refers to the tendency of different, small and localized pockets of culture to take on the ways and values of national culture as it is imposed by television, music and movies.) Local survives. Particular and distinctive survive. Especially in West Virginia. I have just been there for the first time, and it is a jewel of a state. It is like an emerald you dig from a hill with your hands. You know when you've passed into it from the east because suddenly things look more dramatic. You get the impression you're in a real place. All around you are mountains and hills and gullies, gulches and streams. The woods wherever I went were thick and deep. From Morgantown to Ballengee a squirrel can jump from tree to tree. It is a tall state---the hills, trees and mountainsand shadowy-dark, with winding roads, except for where it's broad and beige and full of highway, courtesy of Robert Byrd. The highways are perfect looking, unstained by wear  tear, and not many people seem t) use them. There are little churches in every town, where the highest thing is the steeples , and road signs with exhortations to follow Jesus, and big crosses made of white wood on the side of the road. The ACLU would do well not to come here and do their church-state thing. Three hours into our drive west, a police car drove by, and someone mentioned that was the first one he'd seen since we crossed the state line. Someone else said, approvingly, "Everyone keeps a gun. in West Virginia. Crime is low." Later I would be told it has the lowest violent crime per capita in the United States. It is very nice, when traveling, to see your beliefs and assumptions statistically borne out. Few people I met seemed interested in politics. I got the impression they see it as something dull and faraway, as a normal person would. I was in the southwest comer of the state, in the Fayetteville area of Fayette County, named for the Marquis de Lafayette. When I asked a man tending the grass in front of the statue of Lafayette on the ceurthau lawn why they left the =La" off, he said he didn't know but "maybe it was a little lah dee dab? West Virginia has a town named Artie and a town named Bud. When you are from the Northeast, the talk always goes inevitably to the niceness of the people. rhey're real," as a new resident of Charleston, the state capital, told me. People are nice in the Northeast, too, but there seems a particular dignity and humility to West Virginians. Because it has been left so alone by history, so hard to get to and get out of, West VLginia's people seem to be largely what they were, of Scots-Irish descent, and have remained vividly so. And there was the New River. It cuts through the bottom of a great Appalachian gorge. Its beauty is as striking as the Hudson, only with more trees and wildness and rafts bouncing down the rapids. On Bridge Day once a year the bungee jumpers and parachutists come. The New River is alive. And, I rediscovered the legend of John Henry, the steel-driving man. When I was in grade school in New York they taught us the ballad of City Accepts Donation of 2nd Ave. Property By Fred Long City County, Tuesday, agreed to accept the donation of the burned out Shammaa property at the comer of 2nd Ave. and Ballengee St. The property, formerly housing Dr. Shammaa's downtown medical facility, Tots and Teens and rental units, was destroyed by an act of arson several years ago and has been in a state of disrepair since that time. Last June Mayor Joe Blankenship considered a $250 a month lease for the corner lot with the idea of turning it into a parking lot, however the Council rejected the lease. =The Shammaa family made the offer to give us the property," Blankenship said, "with the stipulation that we not make a parking lot out of it." Blankenship said the Council agreed to accept the property with that stipulation and once the title is transferred to the City they will begin considering idea to upgrade the area. =We don't know at this time what we will be doing," Blankenship said. =We want to beautify that location and make it more appealing for everyone." John Henry, When the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad was being built in the mountains just after the Civil War, the work crews were worked hard. The most famous worker was John Henry, a steel drive r who hammered spikes into the" mountai/side to make space for sticks of dynamite that would blow away the mountain to make room for the tracks. The steel driver and the man who placed and turned the spikes had to work with speed and split-second precision. The men laying down the tracks worked to their rhythm. Words came out of this, out of the rhythm of the hit and the hammer and haul, and the words became chants and poems and folk songs, and they spread from the tracks to the town and then out to the country. John Henry was a young man, black, about 6-foot-2, 190 pounds of muscle. He is said to have been a former slave, and might have been a convict assigned to manual labor. His might and capacity were becoming famous throughout Appalachia when something new happened. During the blasting of the Big Bend Tunnel in the mountains near the town ofTalcott, a rival crew captain brought in a steam drill. He said a machine would pound steel better than a man. John Henry vowed to beat it; nothing's better than a msn. And so the contest commenced. There are many versions of the ballad of John Henryearly versions, folk versions, chain-gang versions, Gand or Opry. Petition Circulating A petition is circulating asking the state to bench the mountain side between the Bluestone Dam and the Lilly Bridge. This area of Rt 20 has been dangerous for countless years because of falling rocks which have damaged numerous vehicles and caused a number wrecks along that stretch of highway. The petition, addressed to Gov. Earl Ray Tomlin, states, "We, the residents of Summers and surrounding counties hereby Petition your office and the State of West Virginia to bench the portion of Rt. 20 from 500 yards northwest of the Bluestone Dam to Lilly Bridge. =The section of Rt. 20 is very dangerous, as basically everyone that travels this road has damage to their vehicles at one time or another. =It is only by God's will that a pile of rocks have not hit a school bus and inured or killed several students." The petition has been placed at several stores throughout the COunty. f Grand Jury Indicts Son of Councilman By Fred Long The Grand Jury, last Tuesday, issued a three count indictment against Charles Stuart Oxley, Ill, 22, son of Hinton Councilman Tommy Oxley, on counts of burglary, destruction of property and grand larceny. Oxley, of Hinton, is charged with allegedly breaking into the home of Tammy Zimmerman last August by kicking in the front door and stealing a TV and other items valued at $1,500, according to the' indictment. An indictment was also returned against Brandon Smith, 22, of Hinton, in connection to the same incident. Smith was indicted with the same charges the indictment shows. Loretta Lynn Foster, 39, of Jumping Branch, was also indicted in connection to the alleged burglary. Foster is facing charges of one count of accessory before the fact to a burglary and one count of accessory before the fact to a grand larcenty. All three indictments were returned on the testimony of Cpl. J. D. Cooper. The Grand Jury issued over 20 indictments when meeting at the Courthouse on Aug. 15. Those indictments follow. James Fleshman, 20, of Hinton, was indicted on one count of fleeing in a vehicle and causing injury, fleeing in a vehicle and causing property damage, fleeing on foot, and obstructing an officer. The indictment was returned on the testimony ofSgt. J. C. Miller. Timothy Glenn Yancey, 47, of Hinton, was indicted on one count of first degree arson. According to the indictment Yancey allegedly attempted to burn his home on Walnut Street. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Hinton Chief D. S. Snavely. Christopher Dominic Thornton, 24, of Hinton, was indicted on two counts of forgery and two counts of uttering. According to the indictment he allegedly forged the signature of Charles A Maxant on two checks against the account of Sew Master in Hinton. One check was in the amount of $200.19 and the other in the amount of $300.87. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Hinton Chief D. S. Snavely. Joel Ross Thompson, 38, of Talcott, was indicted on one count of unlawful assault of a child near a school, one count of assault and one count of battery. According to the indictment the incident occurred near the Summers Middle School last month. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Hinton Chief D, S. Snavely. Melissa Sue Gross, 29, of Hinton is named in two indictments. The first indictment charges her with four counts of burglary and four counts of petit larceny. According to the indictment she allegedly broke into the home of Billy Joe Gross three different times in October and one time in September taking guns and various other items each time. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Hinton Patrolman T. A. Withrow. The second indictment charges her with one count of forgery and one count of uttering. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Cpl. Z. M. Duke. James R. Stone, 40, of Meadow .Creek, was indicted on one count of failure to meet an obligation to provide support for two minors. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Cpl. Z. M. Duke. Timothy Wayne Yancey, 46, of Meadow Bridge, was indicted on one count of burglary and one count of petit larceny. According to the indictment Yancey allegedly broke into the home of Susan Tabor taking items valued at $240. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Deputy S. E. Conner. Timothy Morrison, 23, of Hinton, was indicted on one count of sexual assault in the second degree. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Deputy S. E. Conner. Michael Kasner, 22, of Hinten, was indicted on one count of burglary, one count of brandishing a dangerous and deadly weapon, one count of domestic battery and one count of violation of a domestic violence protective order. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Sgt. T. J. Cochran. Harold Williams, Jr., 59, of Jumping Branch, was indicted on one count of manufacturing a controlled substance. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Cpl. J. D. Cooper. Elizabeth Ann Williams, 47, of Jumping Branch, was indicted on one count of manufacturing a controlled substance. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Cpl. J. D. Cooper. Joseph Marshall Martin, 24, of Hinton, was indicted on one count of failure to provide notice of sex offender registration changes. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Cpl. J. D. Cooper. returned on the testimony of Cpl. J. D. Cooper. Hank Martin, 53, of Beaver, was indicted on two counts of wanton endangerment, one count of brandishing a dangerous and deadly weapon, one count of obstructing an officer and one count of destruction of property. The indictment was returned on the testimony ofCpl. J. D. Cooper. Cassie Lynn Abston, 27, of Talcott, was indicted on five counts of forgery and five counts of uttering. According to the indictment she allegedly forged the name of Dixie Ratliff on five checks totaling $568 between May 15 and May 23, 2011. The indictment was returned on the testimony of Cpl. J. D. Cooper. Jason Lee Boone, 29, of Hinton, was indicted on one count of manufacturing a controlled substance. The indictment was returned on the testimony ofSgt. T. L. Bragg. Kelly Renee Weikle, 21, of Alderson was indicted on two counts of counterfeiting checks. The indictment was returned on the testimony ofSgt. T. L. Bragg. Jessie Edward Rains, 31, of Randall Ray Ward, 45, of Hinton, Alderson, was indicted on two counts was indicted on,one count of of ceuntefeting checks and o burglary and one count of petit count of bringlng tolen property larceny. According to the indictment into the state, a back hoe and bucket he allegedly broke into the home of valued at $18,000. The indictment Kim and Hobart Ward taking items was returned on the testimony of valued at $300. The indictment was Sgt. T. L. Bragg. Alderson Municipal Court The following defendants pending completion of terms. appeared either before Chief James Depriest, 34, Pence Municipal Judge Travis Copenhaver Springs, Driving suspended. Guilty or the Assistant Municipal Judges plea, $200 during the month of September and Bertha E. Kirby, 70, Alderson, October. The dollar amounts reflect Expired motor vehicle inspection. fine and court costs as applicable.  Guilty plea, $50. Donald Boone, 62, Alderson, DUI Daniel Judy, 23, Ronceverte. No 1st, DUI 1st, and no insurance. A insurance and defective equipment. plea agreement was entered by the Not guilty, bound over. defendant and the prosecuting Eloise Depriest, 35, Alderson, attorney for this case. The defendant Controlled substance violation. plead guilty to both DUI charges and Guilty plea, $100 and 10 days jail the no insurance charge was suspended pending completion of l0 dismissed. The defendant will pay days community service. $1,000 fines and costs, remain on 6 Mar] Taylor, 28, Alderson, months unsupervised probation, Expired motor vehicle inspection must attend DUI classes and and noinsurance. Guilty plea,$125 complete four days a month of and 5 days jail suspended pending community service. Sixty days jail completion of 5 days community time was suspended pending service. completion of the agreed terms. Karen L. Poile, 63, Alderson, No Shelly J. Rhodes, 31, motor vehicle inspection. Guilty Barboursville, Expired registration, plea, $50.00. Guilty plea, $150 Cassandra King, 30, Alderson, Robert C. Campbell, 37,Alderson, Shoplifting 1st. Conditional Contributing alcohol to a minor. No dismissal pending completion of 6 contest plea, $100 and one day in jail months unsupervised probation, suspended pending completion of civil remittance to Little General community service, and $75. Ricky Nelson, 32, Alderson, Aaron L. Vance, 32, Alderson, Driving suspended 1st. No contest Controlled substance violation and plea, $150. no insurance. No contest plea, 20 William G. Crowe, 30, Alderson, days jail suspended pending Improper registration, failure to completion of 20 days community appear, and no insurance. Guilty service and $350. plea, 10 daysjail suspended pending Justin L. Surbaugh, 19, completion of community service Clintonville, Shoplifting 1st. Guilty and $300. plea, $75 plus civil remittence to Jeromy D. Deskins, 20, Gadd'sIGA. Ronceverte, No proof of insurance. Tammy Bush, 40, Union, Failure No contest plea, $75. to appear, defective equipment, and A minor appeared with guardian expired operators. Guilty plea, $275. for an ordinance violation. A Defective equipment was dismissed conditional dismissal was granted per officer request. pending completion of education Justin W. Meadows, 21, requirements. Lewisburg, Expired motor vehicle Scan D. Kelly, 23, Lewisburg, registration. Guilty plea, $150. Shoplifting 1st. No contest, $146.84 Stacy Hicks, 28, Alderson, of which $51.84 is remitted to Gadd's Battery. No contest plea, $150 and IGAfor civilpenalty. 5 days jail suspended pending A minor appeared with guardian completion of 5 days community for an ordinance violation. A service. conditional dismissal was granted Willie N. Scott, 23, Alderson, pending completion of education Expired motor vehicle inspection. No requirements, contest plea, $75. Donna Boone, 36, Alderson, A minor appeared with guardian Battery. Per plea agreement a for multiple ordinance violations. conditional dismissal was granted $500 and 200 hours community pending completion of six months service, 6 months unsupervised unsupervised probation and $90 probation, and GED education proof costs. Ten days jail was suspended to court. }