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May 8, 1979     The Hinton News
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2--H[nton News Tues&apos; May 8, 1979 00HINToN ....... Published Tuesdays and Thursdays By the Hinton Publishing Corpormtion 210 Second Ave. Hinton, W.Va. 25951 Bob Front, Co-Publisher Jane Front, Co-Publisher Richard Mann, Editor usPs 24@180 By Carrier 15 Cents Daily Subscriptions: By Mail $10.00 per year U.8. Pmtal regulatkms require Imymeat in advanee. Second class postage. W. ....... paid at Hinton,, Va.j MONEY MATTERS Personal financial planning field grows By DONALD C. BAUDER Copley News Service The personal financial planning movement is only 10 years old -- In fact, the Inter- national Association of Fi- nancial Planners (IAFP) was founded in 1969  but already, "We're very close to being recognized as a profes- sion," says IAFP's chair- man, C. William Hoilman. Hoilman, a certified finan- cial planner with the firm of Mitchell Hoiiman and Associ- ates, Braintree, Mass., was interviewed along with IAFP President Robert W. Spencer o/Los Angeles' Benefit Con- suRants. Financial planners profess to have knowledge in a wide number of areas -- real estate, insurance, stocks, bends, tax shelters, closely held businesses, taxes, leas- For example, Hollman ex- plained that when a client is in the 20 percent tax bracket, he may have only a home, an insurance policy, a checking account and a few shares in a mutual fund. A step up, he may add bonds and common stocks to his portfolio. In the 30 to 50 percent bracket, he may get into mu- nicipal bonds, annuities, growth and more speculative stocks, options, shopping cen- ter participations, rare stamps and coins and the llke. Above the 50 percent level, he starts to speculate in timber, cattle feeding pro- grams, oil drilling, tax shel- ters and the llke. "With today's inflation, too many people these days say, 'Let's roll the dice,'" sald Robert W. Spencer. The fi- nancial planner is Supposed to steer people into invest- Ing, syndications and almost ',mts which are appropriate anything else dealing with a , :;'[rlr financial Status.: " persop's economic exlstence. =However. financlal plan- The financial planner inter- views clients, discovers their financial needs and objec- tives, and prepares a long- run financial plan or strate- gY. Some work mainly for fees others attempt to make their money on commissions (sales of stocks, insurance policies, etc.). Increasingly, financial planners work both for a fee and for commis- sions. Originally, the financial planning movement grew out of a realization by both mutu- al fund and insurance sales- men that they needed each other. Now, people in finan- cial planning may be certi- fied public accountalns (CPAs), estate planners, real estate syndicators, lawyers, brokers, insurance special- ists and others who have a particular specialty, but strive to have knowledge in other related areas. Many financial planning firms have a stable of spe- cialists In several areas. For example, Mitchell Hoilman has an investment adviser, general insurance agent, bro- ker-dealer and tax accoun- tant In-house. The financial planner strives to guide a client through his investment life conservatively -- exposing him to risk only as his in. come becomes large enough to support it. ners are wounded sometimes by the very breadth of their mandate. By opening their doors to people from such a wide variety of disciplines, the financial planners some- times find themselves with egg on their faces. In California and other hot real estate markets, some observers feel that some peo- ple who call themselves fi- nancial planners are too will- ing to put investors in real estate syndications which are on the shaky side. Also, the kinds of companies that ad- vertise in financial planner publications and hawk their wares -- such as tax shelter and oil drilling schemes -- at financial planner conventions and gatherings have a fast- buck image. "We're deeply concerned about such things and we're increasingly careful about such associations," said Spencer. The IAFP has 5,300 mem- bers in 50 states and 60 local chapters. In recent years, membership has quadrupled. Brigham Young University recently became the first ac- ademic Institution to offer a major in financial planning. "It has become the most pop- ular major on campus," said Hoilman. F:4 NEWS VA NEWS Q-- I have a permanent plan insurance policy with the Vet- erans Administration. Is there any loan value on the policy? A-- After the policy is one year old, the insured may borrow up to 94 percent of the accumul- ated reserve value with interest on loan at five percent. Con. tact your nearest Veterans Ad- ministration office. They will help you complete the necess- ary forms. Q-- l receive a widow's pen- sion from the VA. If I receive a cost of living increase in my social security this year, will my VA pension be reduced? A- Public Law 95-5811, effect- ive January I, 1979, prevents any decrease in pension solely due to a social security cost of living increase. Q-- Can I receive educational assistance for an on-the-job training program at a half time rate? A-- No. Educational benefits can only be paid for full time apprenticeship or on-the-job training. Toads have no teeth since they live on insects they can swallow in one gulp. Sitting at our window, over- looking the beautiful, quiet- flowing New River, meander- ing through the stately, green mountains in Hinton, West Vir- ginia. It is spring, and the rain is bringing out the beautiful flowers, tinted with every color. The leaves are bursting out from every bush and tree with their bright colors of green. Suddently, a familar sound is heard in the far distance, and as it draws nearer, you know it it a coal or manifest train winding its way from the West along the Chessic System. You can hear the diesel engine whistle blow- ing for the Barksdale Crossing, which is about three miles below the Hinton Chessie Syst- em Yards. Soon, you look, and coming up along River, you will see three or four diesel eng- ines, with their bright yellow and blue colors, approaching from between the green moun- tains. It is a long manifest train consisting of every type of color- ful boxcars. The engineer waves at the operator as he passes G Cabin, and the operator returns the greeting with a smile and a wave of his hand. They know that all is well, and that the job they have been doing for many years is about to end on this trip as the manifest pulls into the Hinton Yard. Funds Availab00 Federal funds totalling $109,000 have been made avail- able by the WV Department of Education to provide inservice training for adult basic educat- ion personnel in the state and to conduct adult education special experimental demonstration projects. The money is available to county school boards and public and private nonprofit agencies, institutions and organizations. Anyone desiring to apply for a project may obtain more in- formation and pre-application forms from the Department of Education, Bureau of Vocat, ional, Technical and Adult Ed ucation, ABE Program, State Capitol, Charleston, West Vir- ginia 25305. According to State Superint- endent of Schools, Dr. Daniel B. Taylor, the funds are admin- istered under Section 310 of the Adult Education Act passed by Congress. In addition to inservice train- ing for teachers, other special projects eligible for funds in- clude those concerned with cur- riculum materials, adult educ- ation in industry, recruiting and a needs survey. Adult basic education teach- era assist adults without high school diplomas to improve IV. E. Dressier, People, who have never worked around the railroad, don 't realize the number of em- ployees that are required to transport a coal or manifest train to its destination. When a manifest train is traveling miles below Hinton, the Chief Dispatcher and Dispatcher are checking every move of this train from their C T C Board, which is located in their office. The Yardmaster checks with ;he Ope.rator at CW Cabin and receives the time the train will arrive at the Hinton Yard. The Terminal Trainmaster and the Chief Dispatcher will confer to determine when to call this manifest train out of Hinton to Clifton Forge, Va. The Yard Clerk receives the consist of the manifest trains from Russell, Ky. before they leave their yards. He receives these mani- fest consists of his Computer located in the West Yard Office. The officials consult with one another of the consist of this manifest, and they have their plans completed to dispatch it through Hinton Yard without delay, before it arrives at Hin- ton. The Assistant Superintend- ent supervises the movement of this manifest through Hinton Yard. The Terminal Trainmas- ter advises the Yardmaster the time to call the manifest, and he will tell the Crew Dispatcher at the roundhouse the calling time so he can call the engineer and fireman for this regular run one hour a head of the mani- feat's arrival. Then the crew dis- patcher at the roundhouse not- ifies the crew dispatcher at the West Yard Office the time it is called. This crew dispatcher will call the regular Conductor and two Brakemen also ahead of the manifest's arrival. The Check Clerk will check the numbers of each car in the mani- fest as it pulis into the yard, and notifies the yardmaster if his train-cbeck agrees with the waybills of each car. Also checks with the computer con- sist of the manifest. When the manifest stops in the yard, every employee has done or will do, their assign- ment concerning it, and see that it leaves the yard without de- lay. The Hostler ( who is an engineer) and the Herder ( who is a brakeman) relieve the engineer and Fireman, who came out of Russell, Ky. on the diesel engines, and the hostler and Herder take the diesels to the pit track at the roundhouse for inspection. The diesels, that are ready to pull the mani- fest out of Hinton, are await- ing for time to leave on the ready track. In the meantime, the car inspectors are checking the air,w heels and the mech- anical parts of every car in the train. The yardmaster gives his yard Conductor and two brake- men a lineup of this mani- fest, and the crew will switch it to comply with the yardmast- er's orders. The yardolerk mak- es up the consist on the com- puter, and gives the consist and waybills to the conductor, who is called for this manifest out of Hinton, W. Vs. to Clifton For- ge, Va. The yardclerk at Clif- ton Forge, Vs. receives this consist on his computer before the manifest leaves the Hinton yard. So one can see the ab- ility and alertness of every Chessie Cat employee as they perform their duty in seeing that this mani- fest leaves the Hinton Chessie Yard in good condition and on time. It is employees like these fine people in Hinton that spend their lives for the Chessie Sy- stem in seeing that this mer- chandise is delivered smoothly and safely into their customer's hands. They also are working right along with "Chessie, the corporate symbol of the Chesa- peake and Ohio Railway, and now of its parent company, Chessie System, Inc. is in her fourth decade of working on the railroad, and through a planned program of promotion and mer- chandising built around her famous figure, Chessie is lead- ing simultaneously more lives than a cat's proverbial nine. " In the Chessie System, Inc. 1978 Annual Report, "As usual, the operating area of Chessie's railroad- transportatin, mech- anical and engineering- involv- ed the most people in 1978 ( 31,800) and accounted for most of the money spent ($1.3 bill- ion). Buts also as usual, they did the major share of the work that brought in most of Chessie's income. In any year, every- thing and everyone else on Chessie's roads support or com- plement that basic ided. About Your Social Secut00 By Carl Stewart Arlene sat quietly in the soc- ial ecurity office as the claims representative explained the re- quirements for disability bene- fits. "Before you and your two teenagers can get monthly checks," he said, "your cond- ition must be severe enough to prevent any gainful work at least a year. And you need enough work credits to be in- sured." Arlene felt certian she would meet the medical requirements. "I can barely get around due to advanced rheumatoid arthritis, " she replied, squirming un- comfortably in the chair. "And I have diabetes which is hard to control and which affects my vision." "I worked as a maid in private hom most of the time, " she went on, "and can no longer handle all the lifting and bending required. I might be able to do some kind of light work once in awhile, but at 47, with only 7 years in school, and no training .... who would hire me!?" The claims representative cautioned Arlene that, even if she is found "disabled" under social security law, she must also be insured. "At your age, you need about 7 years of covered work earned at any time since 1937 to be 'fully insured'. In additon, you must have at least 5 years credits earned in the last 10 years." A worried look crossed Ar- I.R.S. News return for 1979. Or if you've had moving expenses, a property loss from an accident or had the winning ticket at the race track, you can dind out now what this might mean for next year's filing. Although the filing deadline has past for personal income taxes there still may be some- thing you need regarding your 1978 taxes. If you filed for extension and now need help, found an error in your return and need to make a correction, or ust found out you overlook- ed a tax credit you could have taken, contact your local IRS office for help. People don't just shut down their businesses, stop buying homes for forget about invest- ing money just because the income tax filing season is over. So the IRS doesn't close up its taxpayer service offices after April 16. If you have questions aobut your taxes any time during the year, call the IRS. Or in Huntington, you may locally call 523- 0213, ion Wheeling 233- 4210, in Parkersburg 485- 1601, and in Charleston 345- 2210. When about 150,000 West Vir- ginians waited until the last day to file their 1976 returns the story on taxes for this year ended, right? Wrong! John Cantley, the District Representative for the Internal Revenue Service in Beckley reminds all taxpayers that from now until the start of the next filing season is the best time to get quick and personal assist- ance to any tax related pro- blem. To provide year-round assist- ance to West Virginians, a toll- free ,nurmber will remain in operation. For prompt assist- ance taxpayers may call 1- 800- 642-1931 from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on any weekday. Also, the IRS office in Beckiey pro- vides walk-in taxpayer assist- ance and is open each MOnday and Friday 7:47 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and from 12:45 to 4:30 p.m. "During'th had 33,794 people walk-in to our offices throughout the state and request assistance," said Tom King, Chief of the Taxpayer Service Division for the west Virginia District. "In addition, from January I to April 16, we answered 129,6'12 phone calls on our toll- free lines." The bulk of this assistance is rendered during the final weeks - lene's face. Then she ly confessed that -hold employers had, reporting her wages. I every penny I could said, "and I guss sorry for me l SO we agreed that be reported or the taxg Although Arlene i pay in the short run, have lost valuable urity protection in the I She did not have the work credits needed ability benefits on We were, establish that she worked and earned ial security credit to sured. If you pay a er $50 or more endar quarter, i the wages - and security taxes end of the month quarter ends. For report for the quarter March 31 is due by Only cash pay of $50, must be reported. paid to cover the cost and room and bus 6.13 percent from the v wages and add an security tax of your port the ws ( Employer's Return for Household ees), available from office. Household workers maids, cooks, cleaning gardeners, other persons who about your home. Bat adult or teenage) eluded if they come home to care for the For more reporting wages for employees, ask for a of Social security household employee social security office. es a tear-off card you to IRS to get the forms to report the wages. NOTE; People who ar work in hotels, houses, and are covered even if paid less than $50 a And workers who ilar duties on farms ered, but under itious. Further available at your social office. ) Fie, Vegeta Plants 00bbs & PEACE TALKS /., . The United States and traD North Vietnam agreed on May 3, 1968 to hold talks in W V reading, math and other skills before the middle of April dead- Paris to prepare for peace I0'00 E, "I i era throughout the state. i :  * fore the deadline, 1,417 people The, deadline for receiving ::! r(J s. e r[ew received walk-in assistance and I p re-applicationsisMay21,1979, l!iii ! on April 16, the IRS toll-free V M y 8 F J. lines were constantly busy with ote a o r }, i!l!:i:ii By U. Senator Itobert C. Byrd over 2,400 being answer- ed. "The problem with waiting G ' to the last minute is there might David rants The Graying o/America be a delay incurred in obt- aining taxpayer assistance," Eighteen grants totalling $36, 129.60 were awarded in April by the Humanities Foundation of West Virginia, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grants in- clude six fellowships to hum- anities scholars, the first ever awarded by the Foundation. Regular grants were awarded to the Committee for Adult Education in thq Kanawba Vall- ey, Custom Media Associates, Ecotheater, Inc., Helvetia Rest- oration and Development Association, Prevention Task Force, and West Virginia Theat- er Festival. Mini-grants were awarded to the Committee on the Year 2000, West Virginia Board of Reg- ents on behalf of West Vir- ginia University, West Virginia Labor History Association, West Virginia University Foundation, McDowell Public Library and Monongalia County Consolidated Recreation Com- mission. Maryat Lee of Hinton will direct the project Eco Theat- er, Mountain Voices Ii" sup- ported by a $8,870.00 grant to Eco Theater, Inc. The the.at. er will tour southern West Vir. ginia featuring discussions in. relying the actors, the and ienee and humanities scbolar following each play. America is on the verge of an important trend that will have profound effects in the next century. The number of persons over age 65, the age at which most people become eligible for retirement benefits, has been increasing steadily during this century. The elderly numbered 3 million in 1900. By 1975, the aged totaled 22 million, and by 2030, demographers think the total will hit 52 million. There are two main rea- sons for what is sometimes called, the "graying of America'--the average life expectancy is increasing, while the birth rate is de- creasing. The dearth of young people increases the elderly's percentage of to- tal population. This imbalance will be- come even more marked when the youngsters born in the post-war baby boom become the "senior boom" early in the next century. The effect of the growing numbers of older Ameri- cans can already be seen in the federal budget. In 1978. $112 billion--or'24 percent of the budget--went to the elderly, mostly in the form of Social Security pay ments. Federal estimates are that in 50 years, the outlay will be $635 billion. Policy makers are con- cerned that, unless there arc major changes in the way Americans / work and retire, the nation could be faced with a huge group of aged, former workers sup. ported by a shrinking base of active wage-earners. In 1940, there were nine active workers for every retired person. Today, the ratio is six to one, and by 2030, there will be only three workers for every former job holder. Planners and analysts are already asking ques- tions about future policy choices, In light of recent medical advances, is age 65 "old," and should that be the age of forced retire- ment? Is the trend toward early retirement the best thing for the individual and society? Should the govern- ment and the private sec- tor begin thinking in terms of offering re-training in second careers to middle- aged workers to keep them in the workforce longer? What is the relationship between enforced idleness and poor health? Are there more flexible work hours, part-time work opportuni- ties, or other incentive ar- rangements that would al- low workers to phase into retirement? In many ways, the gray- ing of America is a great victory for our society, and a testimony to the quality of life in our country. But, in order to maintain that quality, planning must be- gin now, so that the nation is prepared for the hahgS that the future will bring. emphasized King. "Some tax matters can't be handled during the non-filing season though,but those that can certainly should he." Tax assistance can be given on items as they occur. For example, if you bought a new home or are making energy improvements on your present home you could find out now what this may mean on your Quisenberry Educator & Paid by the candidate Jimmy's TV Sales & Phone 466- 0466 Your RCA & Zenith TV Dealer & Service Center Call for Fast Service on Your TV We Sell and Install Channel Master Antennas and Rotors, All Purpose and Cut Channel Antennas. Call for Expert Antenna Installation. 466- 0466 Jimmy's TV Let Venus and David put Your Antennas up and they will stay. 2--H[nton News Tues' May 8, 1979 00HINToN ....... Published Tuesdays and Thursdays By the Hinton Publishing Corpormtion 210 Second Ave. Hinton, W.Va. 25951 Bob Front, Co-Publisher Jane Front, Co-Publisher Richard Mann, Editor usPs 24@180 By Carrier 15 Cents Daily Subscriptions: By Mail $10.00 per year U.8. Pmtal regulatkms require Imymeat in advanee. Second class postage. W. ....... paid at Hinton,, Va.j MONEY MATTERS Personal financial planning field grows By DONALD C. BAUDER Copley News Service The personal financial planning movement is only 10 years old -- In fact, the Inter- national Association of Fi- nancial Planners (IAFP) was founded in 1969  but already, "We're very close to being recognized as a profes- sion," says IAFP's chair- man, C. William Hoilman. Hoilman, a certified finan- cial planner with the firm of Mitchell Hoiiman and Associ- ates, Braintree, Mass., was interviewed along with IAFP President Robert W. Spencer o/Los Angeles' Benefit Con- suRants. Financial planners profess to have knowledge in a wide number of areas -- real estate, insurance, stocks, bends, tax shelters, closely held businesses, taxes, leas- For example, Hollman ex- plained that when a client is in the 20 percent tax bracket, he may have only a home, an insurance policy, a checking account and a few shares in a mutual fund. A step up, he may add bonds and common stocks to his portfolio. In the 30 to 50 percent bracket, he may get into mu- nicipal bonds, annuities, growth and more speculative stocks, options, shopping cen- ter participations, rare stamps and coins and the llke. Above the 50 percent level, he starts to speculate in timber, cattle feeding pro- grams, oil drilling, tax shel- ters and the llke. "With today's inflation, too many people these days say, 'Let's roll the dice,'" sald Robert W. Spencer. The fi- nancial planner is Supposed to steer people into invest- Ing, syndications and almost ',mts which are appropriate anything else dealing with a , :;'[rlr financial Status.: " persop's economic exlstence. =However. financlal plan- The financial planner inter- views clients, discovers their financial needs and objec- tives, and prepares a long- run financial plan or strate- gY. Some work mainly for fees others attempt to make their money on commissions (sales of stocks, insurance policies, etc.). Increasingly, financial planners work both for a fee and for commis- sions. Originally, the financial planning movement grew out of a realization by both mutu- al fund and insurance sales- men that they needed each other. Now, people in finan- cial planning may be certi- fied public accountalns (CPAs), estate planners, real estate syndicators, lawyers, brokers, insurance special- ists and others who have a particular specialty, but strive to have knowledge in other related areas. Many financial planning firms have a stable of spe- cialists In several areas. For example, Mitchell Hoilman has an investment adviser, general insurance agent, bro- ker-dealer and tax accoun- tant In-house. The financial planner strives to guide a client through his investment life conservatively -- exposing him to risk only as his in. come becomes large enough to support it. ners are wounded sometimes by the very breadth of their mandate. By opening their doors to people from such a wide variety of disciplines, the financial planners some- times find themselves with egg on their faces. In California and other hot real estate markets, some observers feel that some peo- ple who call themselves fi- nancial planners are too will- ing to put investors in real estate syndications which are on the shaky side. Also, the kinds of companies that ad- vertise in financial planner publications and hawk their wares -- such as tax shelter and oil drilling schemes -- at financial planner conventions and gatherings have a fast- buck image. "We're deeply concerned about such things and we're increasingly careful about such associations," said Spencer. The IAFP has 5,300 mem- bers in 50 states and 60 local chapters. In recent years, membership has quadrupled. Brigham Young University recently became the first ac- ademic Institution to offer a major in financial planning. "It has become the most pop- ular major on campus," said Hoilman. F:4 NEWS VA NEWS Q-- I have a permanent plan insurance policy with the Vet- erans Administration. Is there any loan value on the policy? A-- After the policy is one year old, the insured may borrow up to 94 percent of the accumul- ated reserve value with interest on loan at five percent. Con. tact your nearest Veterans Ad- ministration office. They will help you complete the necess- ary forms. Q-- l receive a widow's pen- sion from the VA. If I receive a cost of living increase in my social security this year, will my VA pension be reduced? A- Public Law 95-5811, effect- ive January I, 1979, prevents any decrease in pension solely due to a social security cost of living increase. Q-- Can I receive educational assistance for an on-the-job training program at a half time rate? A-- No. Educational benefits can only be paid for full time apprenticeship or on-the-job training. Toads have no teeth since they live on insects they can swallow in one gulp. Sitting at our window, over- looking the beautiful, quiet- flowing New River, meander- ing through the stately, green mountains in Hinton, West Vir- ginia. It is spring, and the rain is bringing out the beautiful flowers, tinted with every color. The leaves are bursting out from every bush and tree with their bright colors of green. Suddently, a familar sound is heard in the far distance, and as it draws nearer, you know it it a coal or manifest train winding its way from the West along the Chessic System. You can hear the diesel engine whistle blow- ing for the Barksdale Crossing, which is about three miles below the Hinton Chessie Syst- em Yards. Soon, you look, and coming up along River, you will see three or four diesel eng- ines, with their bright yellow and blue colors, approaching from between the green moun- tains. It is a long manifest train consisting of every type of color- ful boxcars. The engineer waves at the operator as he passes G Cabin, and the operator returns the greeting with a smile and a wave of his hand. They know that all is well, and that the job they have been doing for many years is about to end on this trip as the manifest pulls into the Hinton Yard. Funds Availab00 Federal funds totalling $109,000 have been made avail- able by the WV Department of Education to provide inservice training for adult basic educat- ion personnel in the state and to conduct adult education special experimental demonstration projects. The money is available to county school boards and public and private nonprofit agencies, institutions and organizations. Anyone desiring to apply for a project may obtain more in- formation and pre-application forms from the Department of Education, Bureau of Vocat, ional, Technical and Adult Ed ucation, ABE Program, State Capitol, Charleston, West Vir- ginia 25305. According to State Superint- endent of Schools, Dr. Daniel B. Taylor, the funds are admin- istered under Section 310 of the Adult Education Act passed by Congress. In addition to inservice train- ing for teachers, other special projects eligible for funds in- clude those concerned with cur- riculum materials, adult educ- ation in industry, recruiting and a needs survey. Adult basic education teach- era assist adults without high school diplomas to improve IV. E. Dressier, People, who have never worked around the railroad, don 't realize the number of em- ployees that are required to transport a coal or manifest train to its destination. When a manifest train is traveling miles below Hinton, the Chief Dispatcher and Dispatcher are checking every move of this train from their C T C Board, which is located in their office. The Yardmaster checks with ;he Ope.rator at CW Cabin and receives the time the train will arrive at the Hinton Yard. The Terminal Trainmaster and the Chief Dispatcher will confer to determine when to call this manifest train out of Hinton to Clifton Forge, Va. The Yard Clerk receives the consist of the manifest trains from Russell, Ky. before they leave their yards. He receives these mani- fest consists of his Computer located in the West Yard Office. The officials consult with one another of the consist of this manifest, and they have their plans completed to dispatch it through Hinton Yard without delay, before it arrives at Hin- ton. The Assistant Superintend- ent supervises the movement of this manifest through Hinton Yard. The Terminal Trainmas- ter advises the Yardmaster the time to call the manifest, and he will tell the Crew Dispatcher at the roundhouse the calling time so he can call the engineer and fireman for this regular run one hour a head of the mani- feat's arrival. Then the crew dis- patcher at the roundhouse not- ifies the crew dispatcher at the West Yard Office the time it is called. This crew dispatcher will call the regular Conductor and two Brakemen also ahead of the manifest's arrival. The Check Clerk will check the numbers of each car in the mani- fest as it pulis into the yard, and notifies the yardmaster if his train-cbeck agrees with the waybills of each car. Also checks with the computer con- sist of the manifest. When the manifest stops in the yard, every employee has done or will do, their assign- ment concerning it, and see that it leaves the yard without de- lay. The Hostler ( who is an engineer) and the Herder ( who is a brakeman) relieve the engineer and Fireman, who came out of Russell, Ky. on the diesel engines, and the hostler and Herder take the diesels to the pit track at the roundhouse for inspection. The diesels, that are ready to pull the mani- fest out of Hinton, are await- ing for time to leave on the ready track. In the meantime, the car inspectors are checking the air,w heels and the mech- anical parts of every car in the train. The yardmaster gives his yard Conductor and two brake- men a lineup of this mani- fest, and the crew will switch it to comply with the yardmast- er's orders. The yardolerk mak- es up the consist on the com- puter, and gives the consist and waybills to the conductor, who is called for this manifest out of Hinton, W. Vs. to Clifton For- ge, Va. The yardclerk at Clif- ton Forge, Vs. receives this consist on his computer before the manifest leaves the Hinton yard. So one can see the ab- ility and alertness of every Chessie Cat employee as they perform their duty in seeing that this mani- fest leaves the Hinton Chessie Yard in good condition and on time. It is employees like these fine people in Hinton that spend their lives for the Chessie Sy- stem in seeing that this mer- chandise is delivered smoothly and safely into their customer's hands. They also are working right along with "Chessie, the corporate symbol of the Chesa- peake and Ohio Railway, and now of its parent company, Chessie System, Inc. is in her fourth decade of working on the railroad, and through a planned program of promotion and mer- chandising built around her famous figure, Chessie is lead- ing simultaneously more lives than a cat's proverbial nine. " In the Chessie System, Inc. 1978 Annual Report, "As usual, the operating area of Chessie's railroad- transportatin, mech- anical and engineering- involv- ed the most people in 1978 ( 31,800) and accounted for most of the money spent ($1.3 bill- ion). Buts also as usual, they did the major share of the work that brought in most of Chessie's income. In any year, every- thing and everyone else on Chessie's roads support or com- plement that basic ided. About Your Social Secut00 By Carl Stewart Arlene sat quietly in the soc- ial ecurity office as the claims representative explained the re- quirements for disability bene- fits. "Before you and your two teenagers can get monthly checks," he said, "your cond- ition must be severe enough to prevent any gainful work at least a year. And you need enough work credits to be in- sured." Arlene felt certian she would meet the medical requirements. "I can barely get around due to advanced rheumatoid arthritis, " she replied, squirming un- comfortably in the chair. "And I have diabetes which is hard to control and which affects my vision." "I worked as a maid in private hom most of the time, " she went on, "and can no longer handle all the lifting and bending required. I might be able to do some kind of light work once in awhile, but at 47, with only 7 years in school, and no training .... who would hire me!?" The claims representative cautioned Arlene that, even if she is found "disabled" under social security law, she must also be insured. "At your age, you need about 7 years of covered work earned at any time since 1937 to be 'fully insured'. In additon, you must have at least 5 years credits earned in the last 10 years." A worried look crossed Ar- I.R.S. News return for 1979. Or if you've had moving expenses, a property loss from an accident or had the winning ticket at the race track, you can dind out now what this might mean for next year's filing. Although the filing deadline has past for personal income taxes there still may be some- thing you need regarding your 1978 taxes. If you filed for extension and now need help, found an error in your return and need to make a correction, or ust found out you overlook- ed a tax credit you could have taken, contact your local IRS office for help. People don't just shut down their businesses, stop buying homes for forget about invest- ing money just because the income tax filing season is over. So the IRS doesn't close up its taxpayer service offices after April 16. If you have questions aobut your taxes any time during the year, call the IRS. Or in Huntington, you may locally call 523- 0213, ion Wheeling 233- 4210, in Parkersburg 485- 1601, and in Charleston 345- 2210. When about 150,000 West Vir- ginians waited until the last day to file their 1976 returns the story on taxes for this year ended, right? Wrong! John Cantley, the District Representative for the Internal Revenue Service in Beckley reminds all taxpayers that from now until the start of the next filing season is the best time to get quick and personal assist- ance to any tax related pro- blem. To provide year-round assist- ance to West Virginians, a toll- free ,nurmber will remain in operation. For prompt assist- ance taxpayers may call 1- 800- 642-1931 from 8:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. on any weekday. Also, the IRS office in Beckiey pro- vides walk-in taxpayer assist- ance and is open each MOnday and Friday 7:47 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and from 12:45 to 4:30 p.m. "During'th had 33,794 people walk-in to our offices throughout the state and request assistance," said Tom King, Chief of the Taxpayer Service Division for the west Virginia District. "In addition, from January I to April 16, we answered 129,6'12 phone calls on our toll- free lines." The bulk of this assistance is rendered during the final weeks - lene's face. Then she ly confessed that -hold employers had, reporting her wages. I every penny I could said, "and I guss sorry for me l SO we agreed that be reported or the taxg Although Arlene i pay in the short run, have lost valuable urity protection in the I She did not have the work credits needed ability benefits on We were, establish that she worked and earned ial security credit to sured. If you pay a er $50 or more endar quarter, i the wages - and security taxes end of the month quarter ends. For report for the quarter March 31 is due by Only cash pay of $50, must be reported. paid to cover the cost and room and bus 6.13 percent from the v wages and add an security tax of your port the ws ( Employer's Return for Household ees), available from office. Household workers maids, cooks, cleaning gardeners, other persons who about your home. Bat adult or teenage) eluded if they come home to care for the For more reporting wages for employees, ask for a of Social security household employee social security office. es a tear-off card you to IRS to get the forms to report the wages. NOTE; People who ar work in hotels, houses, and are covered even if paid less than $50 a And workers who ilar duties on farms ered, but under itious. Further available at your social office. ) Fie, Vegeta Plants 00bbs & PEACE TALKS /., . The United States and L, raD North Vietnam agreed on May 3, 1968 to hold talks in W V reading, math and other skills before the middle of April dead- Paris to prepare for peace I0'00 E, "I i ers throughout the state. i :  * fore the deadline, 1,417 people The, deadline for receiving ::! r(J s. e r[ew received walk-in assistance and I p re-applicationsisMay21,1979, l!iii ! on April 16, the IRS toll-free V M y 8 F J. lines were constantly busy with ote a o r }, i!l!:i:ii By U. Senator Itobert C. Byrd over 2,400 being answer- ed. "The problem with waiting G ' to the last minute is there might David rants The Graying o/America be a delay incurred in obt- aining taxpayer assistance," Eighteen grants totalling $36, 129.60 were awarded in April by the Humanities Foundation of West Virginia, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grants in- clude six fellowships to hum- anities scholars, the first ever awarded by the Foundation. Regular grants were awarded to the Committee for Adult Education in thq Kanawba Vall- ey, Custom Media Associates, Ecotheater, Inc., Helvetia Rest- oration and Development Association, Prevention Task Force, and West Virginia Theat- er Festival. Mini-grants were awarded to the Committee on the Year 2000, West Virginia Board of Reg- ents on behalf of West Vir- ginia University, West Virginia Labor History Association, West Virginia University Foundation, McDowell Public Library and Monongalia County Consolidated Recreation Com- mission. Maryat Lee of Hinton will direct the project Eco Theat- er, Mountain Voices Ii" sup- ported by a $8,870.00 grant to Eco Theater, Inc. The the.at. er will tour southern West Vir. ginia featuring discussions in. relying the actors, the and ienee and humanities scbolar following each play. America is on the verge of an important trend that will have profound effects in the next century. The number of persons over age 65, the age at which most people become eligible for retirement benefits, has been increasing steadily during this century. The elderly numbered 3 million in 1900. By 1975, the aged totaled 22 million, and by 2030, demographers think the total will hit 52 million. There are two main rea- sons for what is sometimes called, the "graying of America'--the average life expectancy is increasing, while the birth rate is de- creasing. The dearth of young people increases the elderly's percentage of to- tal population. This imbalance will be- come even more marked when the youngsters born in the post-war baby boom become the "senior boom" early in the next century. The effect of the growing numbers of older Ameri- cans can already be seen in the federal budget. In 1978. $112 billion--or'24 percent of the budget--went to the elderly, mostly in the form of Social Security pay ments. Federal estimates are that in 50 years, the outlay will be $635 billion. Policy makers are con- cerned that, unless there arc major changes in the way Americans / work and retire, the nation could be faced with a huge group of aged, former workers sup. ported by a shrinking base of active wage-earners. In 1940, there were nine active workers for every retired person. Today, the ratio is six to one, and by 2030, there will be only three workers for every former job holder. Planners and analysts are already asking ques- tions about future policy choices, In light of recent medical advances, is age 65 "old," and should that be the age of forced retire- ment? Is the trend toward early retirement the best thing for the individual and society? Should the govern- ment and the private sec- tor begin thinking in terms of offering re-training in second careers to middle- aged workers to keep them in the workforce longer? What is the relationship between enforced idleness and poor health? Are there more flexible work hours, part-time work opportuni- ties, or other incentive ar- rangements that would al- low workers to phase into retirement? In many ways, the gray- ing of America is a great victory for our society, and a testimony to the quality of life in our country. But, in order to maintain that quality, planning must be- gin now, so that the nation is prepared for the hahgS that the future will bring. emphasized King. "Some tax matters can't be handled during the non-filing season though,but those that can certainly should he." Tax assistance can be given on items as they occur. For example, if you bought a new home or are making energy improvements on your present home you could find out now what this may mean on your Quisenberry Educator & Paid by the candidate Jimmy's TV Sales & Phone 466- 0466 Your RCA & Zenith TV Dealer & Service Center Call for Fast Service on Your TV We Sell and Install Channel Master Antennas and Rotors, All Purpose and Cut Channel Antennas. Call for Expert Antenna Installation. 466- 0466 Jimmy's TV Let Venus and David put Your Antennas up and they will stay. 2--H+nton News Tues. May 8, 1979  +. /HINTON NEWS -" Pablbke day| lad Therulayl ay the Htu P.bUlhlllg Cm'porl tlu 210 mmmd Ave. Hlntu. W,Va. Zsl mttmB*to,+mdow,- ppte, who mve n lmS me bauuf, qet- wkedaroeder,tad, d ntn N m, mr+ 't llm me nber uS - Bob FVonL Cc-Pub]isher trig mroufa the etabely, m Jane Front, Ce-PuMisher Lains m ln, Wt V- . If  ng, ed me rn RidmMann, Editor  m-alitag t me beaetU.1 rlm+, tared m every l "e l.v  bUng out qsPs me-zse I ery trash d tree wtm thor t fo at mean. By C.rrk hgcrlp411ml: Sudday, a tmUar d 15 Cents Daily ByMIU heardmmefdJmm,du $ln( per year Itera+ylmowJtlta I  rremt tram winding o.s. l+l.l r,,pl.tlM..',re.l+ Its way r the wmt Imm me wbLc m bout three mite+ be the Inn*on G;emle syst am Yore.. stun, y Ik, d . omg .p .Long m,eu wm . . in, "+th their btght yellow ..d t+l.e 1, approaching m bet me 8ree m- MONEY MA+FI'ERS ,am It I a long manlf.t train Personal financial ..... Tim ember wa at me planning field grows ........... an me perm t the 8rectal with a sme and a By DONALD C, BAUDE, IIt F example, Hdilra ex- wave of his hand They know coele t+e se+wl mm. um hen a eight Js mm l t+ e. a,, mat nm b in the 0 pereeqt tax braeket, they here been doing for many The I:ersona] financial hemnyhaveoalyaho,an pearslaabutendonthbstrp plannJng movet Iv ly I0 Insunm poUcy, a checXlng m the nffet polk into the years old _ in fact, 9m incr. ant and a few abain a Hinton yard tlOnel Ameoclatlon of FI. mutt fund, A step up, e ............................... Fu d fan.dud m t+tt - but ,ettstohlsporUOllo, n almaby."We'mveyuloto In me 3O to e pet .... +ng+++ +a+ .............. Available mien," ya IAFP'S chal aletpal bonds, annuities. n. C+ wmiam Ilotlm.  and mo weculatl Feder at fun totallin 8 Hollman, n rlned flna Moclt s, options, shoppmg n. $1,000 have been made avail- cml pla with tt:e from of tee parttotpatons, rare abLe by the WV Departmt of MitCheLL HOflmananA.ct M, amps and  and the Educatitoprevdetiee ales. Btntra. Ma. was like Above the f+0 pent training f addt hesse edgar. lmervle*ved along wire IAFP I1, be m,ar to speeu]abe Ion perr+l in the state d to PreValent Robert W. spen In Umber, cattle feeding pr  Lm Ange]' BeirUt Con- 8ams, art drilling, tax abet. ndt adult edueatt m+eeia] pertmenta] demotrati ttms Financial ptn pmt term and the Ie. projects. num/l't  r o a -- s many peple theyay, ctyh]boardandpublte estate, lmuran, sitka, 'Let's  tee dice,'" "Jd nndprivatenonprofilageies, nde tax m'm*to, elly Roben w spaer The #I+ ltituti and nrganitlou nanlat p]a b suppu Anydstrthgmnpp]y fern betd busS+ ta lea+ t tl ' * o to g peep+e hte mvem pjeez y obtain mo In+ ing sy0d ca  and  bl yhle 8 else dealing wtth a " Is w ell  appropriate ' Iv exstemee :11 pmaetal tus fatim ad we-applitl per,secoe, om be " +HOwever flnamt pan- fornsfmtheDepadmenlo 'me lel plar in r- ' deal tl Ed,+atton, BU of Vat- views orients, dt mete   + e m innaL ThnleaL and Adtdl Ed. .n  one - by me very eadm ot mer tires, a.d prepa a long- mdele By opening mew atLon, ABE Program, State Ibctfd pl  sLrate- doo/ to people from h a CaP Rol, Charlton, W( Vtr. wlde variety of dtcJpllnes, gLnta /Some rk maly for f me fmll pla m According to State Superint- othem atpLtn mak+tlmt r Um lind /bemlv wtm denLuiSehts, Dr.DielB- money on commissions egmtbelrfas Taylor, the fde a admtn. +. cmuomm and o  sbere+ der mm*J aid ot the (e+ ut stocm mmm pot+etes, etc,). Insng, i t malkets, m Adtdt Edatlon Act passed by on Il that me pea- Cmgress for a f d f t- pie who eatt the ti* In addition to Liee train. etal plain  too wm- tug for teachers, oU..er special g Ortgmldly, the financial tq 8 to put instora in real pjts eligible f fcL is. esta s3m61eaUo whlctt  elude th rned with c- p]annmg severest 8row out  tl gmky rode AJso, me ricul materials, adult eden. era lu by both mum- Jlms of pan mat ad- atLoninindUw, z.e<,l,+lt ti d d fund d sumn ] verte b] fleal ptr a needs eey n that G'eY n eh P ublleat and hawk their AdUn basic edti teach. other N, people tn final- w -- tomb  tax eiter  aist adUltS wLthOut high cml ptannmg may be m. and o drmlng aehem -- at h] diplomas to improv e fled public aecountaths falane;aplannernvenUs (CpA.), te pl, l and gamering hove a fal. ding* math and other skill esmt syadb+an, lawe, buck Image in eLa and Itn8 t- brakes, Jmuean speetaJ- '+We're a+eply cernm  thg the state lsm and others wbe have a about eh thlng and we' The deadline for rivtng partleular speetaRy, but Ilnglv camtu about papplitiomisMaygLff ri to have krleflSe In such aoeiatlona/' said uther ]ated a. 8pe. Many finagled pannlng 'Pro IAFp h +,3O0 mum. fms have a Uable of ape- ben in  states an0 ee ]al e,o,+.+in ++, ,a ,n +'. ,o , .-, Urants example, mlteaeu no,man merlp has quadrupled has an mnm adviser. Blam Yomg ummrmty geral mmm agent, b ntly bed'.me me firm a er.deal and mx au+ ademte mmnutm, to offer a Etgtmn ants totamng e, tent In-bourn mJ+ in flmmtm plannmg, m eo w awarded to Arfl by The Unanclat pianner "Ithaslmeomememompo me Hanlt+. Poundatton of lves to guide a client ularmaJoronmmpm,"sam wmt Vrgtnts, astatela++gram through hm invmtm+t ]ue :+mln. or me NattOmll EP.dowmmt tar mnmatlly -- posb]g the ttntttm.  grants L hlm to rm oily as ms in+ olu+e six teunwsm;s to h- rome becom tar+++ emugh OdiUm mholam, the nmt  m rappen It awarded by me predation, Imm,nr grants  awarded FA NEWS ............ mmt+m ia t vmawh van- ey, c'tm medm Ao<late, w,P+mws + or tving t in my F.<:otheat+,[nc,,melveUaReet. .. z ha a 0et  ial uHty tiLt yr. w+U +arts md I*elommt +n rn+y mm me vet- my VA nn be red'ed+ ,no,m, erevm+m T+k +ann Admt, dstr.tm. Is mum A- Pub]+ Law -mm, eJfect - F+, and Wmt virginia Theet. anylmnvalmmthepoliey? lye JanUary 1, zst, ppevente ePentivaL A Aft+ me policy ts year any deeas tn penstm mley Mine+rant+  aw++d to old. the{muredmymup d+toamalseewtymto meC+mmttmemmeymme0, to 4 pm+ct o+ me eumut. l+vlng ln, wt v+rla een ot l+e- atedmeval+Whhinmt --tnzreeetmedmtml mrs m bat d wat va- ne Iron at five pereenl Con. amisumm fw + on-th-j+b grate Un]vmlty, Wmt Virginia tact ymr nearee Vetam Ad. tmLntlmram at a half Use Labor History AHoeiatim, mth+watmn mtge. '1 wtU rate? Wet vjrgtn provemty help ym +p]eto me m A- No, Edmtiontl be+if FomdaUon, MeDowelJ Public a+ forms mn ly be paid t+ faU time UbrarandmonopUaCemty Q- t receive a meow,s pea- a+mtabLp + re.me-Job Comet;dated Re'eaUon Cem- stun from the VA. If I r a training mission maryat Lee ot Utnten wm direct the <'eeet E,o Theat. E<m ter, inc r+ tlmat er will to uth Wt VIr glnia featuring diseaMio in lvlr the nc(, the au - - - imlce and hnitl belare Taint h  lh ti 0T"ly live  in ley an folling h play+ +,llow 1. o JW. Railroadin',,+ + I About Your syc,,isun W. E. Dressier Lene t quietLy in the tel +ty otfi  the dai re0rtatt pttdned me  q.tremm for msabmty hen willealltSerCondter emplnyeetheyperfetbeh- fits "Befyayetw and two Brak also ahead duty in l that thJe manJ+ teege n get mtly or the mamtCs tmvah Tie ft teav me mated Omste checks," he td...your nd- piny that  required to Check Cerk will cheek the yard in rood condition and on iLion mmt be v Lmh to freeport a al  manfft nbe of vac ear to me Use It Is ployeee Itke th prevent any gatntd work at tin to its dtinatlon Whoa mare- finepeepletntlintonmatpend ]st a year And u nee mant tram  travetmg fmtttpullstntotlyard, ar their Iv f the Lme Sy- engh work credits to be in+ mu bel mntoa, the Cet nts U yr.l.ster tt hts stem in t*ng that mrs m- sure." DmlmtcPer and Dpmcher  traln<hk agree+ wtm the chend+ a delivered smoothly Arlene tett rtn she dd eheel ery mnve ot this waybills of ch r. Also andfelytntotheretom'e mtthemedllreqtaremts train fm their C T C Bard, ehlm with the mputer n hands Tey alo a working ,,[ n badly get amid d to whehlltedLntheiroffi ststofmemanft, rght aLong wtb "o:essie, the advance<rheatoidarthritis. The yardma eh th  the mtmt st m r0rate symbol of the Ca ,, she raled, sqmrmmg . :he opeat at ON Cabin and the ya, ery ploy has peake and Oto BaUway, and cnmfortabLyinttmehalr. "Adl b]v the tme the trat U de  wm de. tbetr n. now of ts parent company, have dahet which  hard to ar at the Ifinton yard The mt mmglt,and that Clmssle System, t m m h etl and which a ffls my Tmma] Trainst and the it leavm the yard without de- fothdeCade of kJng  the vmion" Chief Dmpat Will pZ to lay The Ha C who  an ratld,andthroghaplanned +'l worked  a md in detine when to caU role gin) and the tlerder { who psrem of promotion and met- private hom mt of the ttme, manLft tram out of nton to s a brak) mle the chanding bugt amid her " she went on, "and can C[llton Fro+go, Va The yard gl and Fim, who famo fig, ,+-sie is ]d+ longer handle oil me lifting and Clerk receiv the eist of the me t o[ RB, Ky. on the Ing aimuttanly mo liv benmng req,red. I naght be monfft trat fwm RII, dlt gtn, and the lutler than a t'o provblal nine. " able to do se kind of light Ky hefo they Ive their and Herde take the d to lntheChieSyst,lne, workontawhile, butat47, yatLltetvthmadi- tbep,aekattheroentaw ttVSAnnualReport,'Asl, withonlyTyeaninhool, and fl misbe of his Computer  b]opectJon. The CUIS, that the operating  of cbe 'o no tralnlng who d hire ItedtntheWtYardOffi are dy to pull the manb railroad- tramprtatin, med. me?" 'I officials eotd/ with o tt t of Hinted. am await- ardl and gneertng - lively. 'the clams presentatLve otber o the eoiet of ts ing for time to Ive  the e the t peOpLe In  ( eauted Are that, even if manlft, and they have their rby track. In the mnttme, 31,reel and aeemnted for mt she is [od "bbled" der pla mpleted to thspatch it the car Iltol a choking of Ibe mey SP ent ($13 bill- slal lalty law, she mt tbroug nton Yard without thear,wheelsandtbemh- ).Uut.ahmasmt, theydd also be tmured ++At ye age, detay, beforelarr+vatHm- antcalparmoftnthe tlmmaJoratmoftbeworkthat you need about 7 yea of ton TheAssstantSu0erthtond- traln. TboyardratergivmbLs bmult Ln mmt o Chede's vet wk ed at any entsupervsthemovto[ ysrdConduetandtbrak tme. In any y. ery. time since 17 to be ,muy this mani/mt Lhugh Hinton men a p of th mad- thing d everye el on ured' Ie addton, y mt Yard TheTemmatTrail- ft, andtheewwmswltcht Clmmsie'sdssupportor. have aL It 5 y crests ter adv the Yardmast the to cmply with the yardnst- plement that haste ded. earned in the tat 1o yaa" timetollmemanifl, andhe er'sorde.Theyardclekmak. A womed look ermsed  gardeners, will tell the Crew Divtcber at  up the csit on the m- the roun0be 0e mng Hme put, and vm tbe oomt nnd  he can call the engmr and waybills to me ndtor, who ................ IRS Ne fo afhhd ofgtbe mani islledfthismanilttf Hthton, w Va to c]m For+ IAT Ion Forge, Vs. lv thin patoher at the mdho not cstot on ht mpm befo ifi the ew dspateher el the the manlier lv tha FIinl ret for t979 Or if y've hod Wt yard Offi the time it is yard SO o can  the ab. moving expel, a property of social nrity a calle nis cw dispatoh ility and atert <:4 ery Islromanaceidthadthe household empiny I winning tleket at the ra track ' aia] Ry office you c cfind eel now what this  a teaelf rd you might mean for xl yr'o liling LO  the wa dlhogh the filing deadiine has past for peunol moose ae work n hotel, tax there otm may be m hom, and i , thin K you need resarding y a oved even ii etmton ond now need lp. found an er In yo u and need to make a eeton. tenr ntaet yo ]1 I offi) offLee for help Pple don't jt shut d their bins, stop buylng bem for forget about t.t+ in mo,ey jt bc. the in.me tax riling n is aver So the [ItS dn't eLo up its taxpayer ice offi after April 16 If ynu have quti aobut yo Laxm any time ding the yr, 1] the iP,. or 4210, in Parkebg 485- 1601, and in CharLt 345- L0. Pc TALKS The United States and Chegsie Cat Nort vlem agreed May 3,18e8 to hold tal m Pls to ppa for rea uatlom The Graying of Artco Ameoa s on the ee u r t Uon m of an m ant t tt , to worke ,up- wU v pfond ec faend wlt a h op ot In me nt cereus. Tb  hy, ,nkg b nmber o Ion over ,ge of ,cttve g-,. . tha a a winch mt Zn . n  nine n ,,,,mg stodllr Uo I ,t to one. ,d by The merly nnmr a ue wke for e minin, to 1. By lrS. tnrmer  der. the ,gd tol  mt,,. Ph,ne d anet and by 1. demoapem  al uk qu- thin e tol wnl hit S2 ao ,,t t,tu U ehot.  Ut  at mmon T t - +++,++or +ha + ct a+ ,w+"",m. "+' .d .... ,, a "nd." and euld met bo meca"--the avenge ]te ment?  the nd toward etancy  tneing, early tent the est while te birth te L de. tbLn for the mVuSl az.d 1 pn)atlon. of oezng trelzdng in when the youngsbe bum n the wko Innger? bt enfo l+Jen early In be ne ntur mo nexlble rk hour, The efft of the wing prt-t work opportunl- nnmbo of OZ mt- U. nr nmee ,nUe - $H2 billon ur.24 pent tmen ? nf tha bodget went tn the + n ny ys. the y. of 9aZ ecra pay+ vlctofornorsoeW, and re Ut n  y,. the of ,e in ou ,,t ut. outtar U bo  ninon, m or to intn thin Pn[l make  n+ quality, plannln must be. c that. unl Che innnw that theatlon major ehang in the Iopvardor thee. way mmns wnr an that tbe futuwJllbHng. When about 150,OO0 wt Vir- gZnia waited tU the last day to me their t' ra the tnry n. tsx for Ihs y John Canney. the Dlstriet aeptative foe the lnteal Rven.e Settee in Srkley min nit py mat fm w til the start o the neat mthg n is me bet Lme to get qmck and penal smt- on to any tax istnd pro- bLem. To pvide year rod ost- a In Were VirSniar. tnU rr ,nnmber wiLl main in nperatinn For prompt st anee taxpyen may cll I 0 4.ml fm S: .m until 4:0 pro. on any wkdsy. Also, the mS otn m Bmey pro- rides warn.in taxpayer .st anee and m open ch Monday and Fr, :: a.m. to 1: am and fm n:4S to : p.m. ".'int d ,7e4 people walk-  o or thuta the orate nnd Kin, Cle  ma Taxi.yet Srvl Wvion for the wt virginia DIstrLet '+In addition, tm Janry Z tu ^pr116. we aw IZ,et2 pone Us on tell- f lin." Te b.lk or mid nsta. is dere dng me final w n the midme of April ded- U. Vur the t wk f me me, 1,t7 people le walk in t.nce and on April to, me X tnUf L we stautlr b]my wire or ,0 Call* beIng answer- to U t mube s mere mtght be a lay i t. ebt- nnS tsxpsy ismn," empss;zed rang "So tax mac n't he hanme urts tha  eertay should Tx autan ran be v Imm  they  For expte, it you bought a home  a mg energy provemm  y present hme y ud and t w wst tb]s may m  y Jimmy's TV Sales & Phone 466- 0466 Your RCA & Zenith TV Dealer & Service Center Call for Fast Service on Your TV P.rlm,m . c.l c.*J A.mms, cau Im + n A.tmma 466- 0466 Jimmy's TV