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February 7, 2017     The Hinton News
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February 7, 2017
 

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The Wilderness Society and Appalachian Trail Conservancy Visit Peters Mountain to Gathering around the at Trail Monroe and the Discover Monroe map prior to hiking to the Team, adjacent to the Peters Appalachian Trail on Peters Mountain Wilderness and the Mountain On Thursday Jan, 26th Appalachian Trail, said that "Peters representatives from The Mountain is a magical place filled Wilderness Society, theAppalachian with springs and aquifers. It is the Trail Conservancy, the Virginia source of water and life for Wilderness Committee and local thousands of residents in Monroe citizens from Monroe (WV), Giles County." (VA) and Montgomery (VA) counties At the end of the 4 hour hike, trekked their way into the Peters officials from The Wifcferness #Mountain Wilderness Area and the Society went to view the Rich Creek Jefferson National Forest to the Spring that is the source of Rich Appalachian Trail to assess the Creek and a secondary water source impacts should the Mountain Valley for the Red Sulphur Public Service Pipeline be built in the present District. They commented that this proposed corridor, was a an alarming example of what These 17 individuals observed could be extremely affected or and documented potential severe contaminated by the current MVP impacts to unique land features, route. Brent Martin, Southern such as the total destruction to Appalachian Regional Director for Mystery Ridge on Peters Mountain, The Wilderness Society said it was impacts to numerous springs and one of the most incredible springs he other water resources found in or had ever seen. near the pipeline path, construction Later they attended a public roads and work areas. They also meeting with local citizens to hear found that the current path would their concerns. They stated that The severely impact Appalachian Trail Wilderness Society shares their itself as well as to one of the its most concerns and were committed to iconic view, the view across Monroe, protect the Wilderness, the Jefferson Summers, Greenbrier, Mercer and National Forest and the Raleigh counties from "Rice's Field" Appalachian Trail in the area. The near Simms Gap. meeting was well attended by The Wilderness Society citizens from Monroe and Summers representatives Brent Martin, Hugh Counties and representatives from Irwin and Michael Reimer and, the WV DEP. Appalachian Trail Conservancy On Friday Morning two regional executive director Andrew representatives of The Wilderness Downs with local concerned citizen Society along with members of from Monroe, Giles and Preserve Monroe, Save Monroe, Montgomery counties at Rice's Field and Indian Creek Watershed and near Simms Gap on Peters environmental attorney Tammy Mountain. They are standing on Belinsky attended a meeting in the the Appalachian Trail near the GW & Jefferson National Forest crossing of the proposed Mountain office in Ropn0ke YA, to yoice their Valley P1pellne crossing o~ t~e ' ~ ' ~hall n tithe Forest ~ ~ ~ '~donce-rn ~ahd tb e g Appalachian Trail on Peters Service to do their jobs to protect the Mountain in Monroe County. forest and not to succumb to political While standing on top of Peter's az,d or corporate pressure. Mountain, Andrew Downs, Regional The Wilderness Society Director for the Appalachian Trail representatives will discuss a plan Conservancy Central and Southwest of action with their headquarters Virginia District explained to the office in Washington D.C. and return group that Mountain Valley had to the area in the near future. They rejected alternatives without have a meeting schedu]ed with the adequate analysis of those local Forest Supervisor, JobyTimms alternatives where theAT is already in February and are contacting the impacted by development such as Southern Regional District Forester, existingroads or utility corridors. He Tony Tooke in Atlanta GA to set up also spoke of the view impacts on a meeting with him ASAP. Little Mountain and across Monroe Representatives from Monroe County. Downs, speaking for the County will be invited to those ATC said that Mountain Valley has meetings. failed to complete a key analysis of Prior to the Thursday and Friday the pipeline's visual impacts to the activities, The Wilderness Society's users of the AT, which has a huge representatives Brant Martin and regional, natior/al and international Hugh Irwin were takenon a guided constituency. TheAppalachian Trail tour on Wednesday afternoon Conservancy has over 40,000 through the Brush Mountain members in all 50 states and Wilderness Area and the numerous other countries. It is Inventoried Roadless Areas (IRA) estimated that about 3 million visitors visit the trail yearly. It is a major part of the tourism industry of the area. The Appalachian National Scenic Trail or AT as it is known by many, was started in 1922 completed in 1937, and stretches roughly 2,200 miles through 14 states from Katahdin, Maine, to Springer Mountain, Georgia. Its presence in the region is frequently cited by economic development organizations as an important lifestyle amenity. The Appalachian Trail on Peters Mountain in Monroe and Giles counties is regarded as one of its most treasured visual areas on the AT. The conservancy encouraged people concerned about the pipeline's impacts on the trail toshare those fears with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Others participating on the January 26th visit to Peters Mountain included Hugh Irwin, Mike Reinemer, and Brent Martin of The Wilderness Society, as well as Mark Miller, Executive Director of the Virginia Wilderness Committee. Irwin who is the Landscape Conservation Planner for The Wilderness Society said the route threatens profound impacts to what hedescribed as "wilderness values," including nature not touched by development and the sources cf clean water for the area that is protected and sheltered by wilderness areas. He furthermore said that Mountain Valley would be hard pressed to find a more unsuitable route for the pipeline, when takin\g.conservation values in consideration. Dana Olson a member of Save which are part of the Jefferson National Forest in Montgomery County (VA). They also observed the Old Growth Forest, the Mount Tabor Sink Hole Plain, the Siusser's Chapel Conservation Area and the crossing at Craig's Creek. Lynda Majors with Preserve Montgomery County (VA) provided an excellent initial look at these areas, Maury Johnson a member of the POWHR Coalition, from Monroe County (WV) and Tammy Belinsky, environmental lawyer were part of this tour. On Wednesday evening people from the Blacksburg area attended a meeting with The Wilderness Society Representatives, arranged by Preserve Montgomery County and the VA Tech Chapter of the VA Student Environment Coalition on the campus of Virginia Tech. You can watch a video from the trip on Thursday and the meeting on Thursday night on YouTube to be released soon, The video title will be ~The Wilderness Society Explores Impacts to the Appalachian Trail - Discover Monroe Episode 9". Those making the tour on Wednesday were: Hugh Irwin Landscape Conservation Planner The Wilderness SocietyAsheville, North Carolina; Brent Martin Southern Appalachian Regional Director The Wilderness Society; Shelby, North Carolina Maury Johnson, member of the ATC, The Wilderness Society, Save and Preserve Monroe, the Discover Monroe Team and the POWHR Coalition Steering Committee Tammy Belinsky, environmental lawyer from Floyd County Lynda Majors, Preserve Montgomery County. Those making the trip on Thursday were: Hugh Irwin, Landscape Conservation Plann er The Wilderness SocietyAsheville, North Carolina; Brent Martin, Southern Appalachian Regional Director The Wilderness Society Shelby, North Carolina; Michael Reinemer The Wilderness Society National Office gton D C, Mark Miller, Executive Director, Virginia Wilderness Committee, Lexington VA; Andrew Downs Appalachian Trail Conservancy Regional Director Central and Southwest Virginia Roanoke VA; Russell Chisholm, Preserve Giles and POWHR Coalition Steering Committee Erin McKelvy, Preserve Montgomery; Kim Kirkbride, PreserveGiles and POWHR Coalition Steering Committee; Laurie Ardison Save Monroe and Co-founder of POWHR Coalition; Dana Olson Member of ATC and The Wilderness Society, Save Monroe & the Discover Monroe Team; Maury Johnson, member of the ATC, The Wilderness Society, Save and Preserve Monroe, the Discover Monroe Team and the POWHR Coalition Steering Committee; Joe Chasnoff Save Monroe, Preserve Monroe and the Discover Monroe Team; Russell Chisholm, Preserve Giles; Herman Mann, member of Save Monroe, Discover Monroe Team Paula Mb_nn, member of Preserve Monroe, Save Monroe, Discover Monroe Team and the ATC; Duncan Adams Roanoke Times Reporter; Erica Yoon, Roanoke Times Photographer; Rusty, The Pipeline Fighting Dog and his sidekick Gus. For more information read]watch the following from WVNS TV 59 News and The Roanoke Times: http ://www.wearewvproud.com/ story/34359942/monroe-pipeline- opponents-secure-support from- national-wilderness- society#.WlsvwFxSOxl.facebook ht tp://www, roanoke.com/ business/news/pipeline-s-impacts~ on-appalachian-trail-raise-concerns/ article_c536b260-ea3a-55d7-blle- 9e037d2ab252.html JOHN HENRY DAYS The John Henry Days Committee will be meeting the 3rd Thursday of every month. The meeting will be held at 6:00 P.M.in the basement of the Trinity United Methodist Church in Talcott. Everyone is invited to attend. Volunteers are always needed! Next meeting date is February 16. ACCEPTING DONATIONS Hinton Area Foundation Accepting Flood Relief Donations. For those asking how they can help those affected by the flooding in Summers County (100% goes to the needs of local citizens), Hinton Area Foundation accepts tax deductible donations online via PayPal or credit card at http://hintonareafoundation. org or checks can be mailed to Hinton Area. Foundation, PO Box 217, Hinton, WV 25951. Please note 2016 Flood Victims when you make your donation. If you have questions, please call the HAF Office at 304-466-5332, ~ontact Deborah Clark, president at deborah.clark@suddenlink.net or get in touch with any HAle board member. NARCONON Narconon reminds families that abuse of heroin and opiod drugs has become a national health crisis. Learn to recognize the signs of heroin abuse and get your loved ones help if they are at risk. Visit www.narcononnewliferetreat.org/ blog/naloxone-availability.htn~l to learn about the overdose reversing drug known as naloxone and find out its availability in your state. ADDICTION SCREENINGS Narconou can help you take steps to overcome addiction in your family. Call today for free screenings or rewferrals.. 1-800-431-1754. V.F.W MEETING V.F.W Casey Jones Post 4500 meetings 3rd Monday 7:00 p.m. monthly at Veterans Museum 419 Ballengee St. Hinton. Veterans Needed. Call 304-250-4152 or 304-573- 3550 for more information. *** Talking much about oneself can also be a means to conceal oneself. --Friedrich Nietzsche Food For New (NAPS)--Pregnant women spend loads of time worrying about every aspect of their baby's develop- ment, starting with their nutrition. But here's some food for thought: After your little one finally arrives, it is no time to let the cookie crum- ble. Sure, you're exhausted, irrita- ble, and moving 100 miles per hour, but postnatal nutrition is just as important, especially when you are breast-feeding. But good news: There's no reason to stress about it--that's what a prenatal vitamin is for! Although it's called a "pre"- natal vitamin, a new mom should continue taking her supplement during this "post'-natal period, especially if she is breast-feeding, to ensure she and her baby get the nutrients they need. Here are some specifics you need to know about your daily intake: Prenatal/Postnatal Vitamins: Ask your doctor about OB Complete Gold. It's the FIRST and ONLY pre- natal vitamin to contain OmEGGa DHA, a form of DHA derived from the eggs of cage-free hens. Because they're not marine based, there's no fishy taste or risk of ocean-borne contaminants. Its comprehensive formulation of important ingredi- ents comes in one easy-to-swallow softgel. The body-ready form of DHA is found naturally in the brain, eyes and breast milk and is easily absorbed, digested and distributed into the body's tissues. It also comes with a daily treatment tracker so busy morns can easily see if they have taken their pill each day. Protein: You should have two to three servings of protein a day; about three or four ounces of meat, fish or poultry. The Food and Drug Administration, however, recom- mends that nursing mothers not eat shark, swordfish, king mack- erel and tilefish because 6f their high mercury content. ght: Post total Nutrition Advice ires New mother need to eat right for their own health and for their baby'. Calcium: The sugSested daily intake of calcium for breast-feed- ing mothers is 1.300 milligrams per day. The best sources of cal- cium are milk, yogurt, hard cheeses, calcium-fortified orange juice and calcium-fortified tofu. One cup of milk or yogurt contains 300 milligrams of calcium. Iron: The suggested daily intake is nine milligrams from meat, poultry, some seafood, dried beans, dried fruit and egg yolks. Extra iron from your prenatal vi- tamin will help prevent anemia. Vitamin C: Nursing mothers need slightly more vitamin C than they did during pregnancy, about 120 mil- ligrams a day. Vitamin C can be found in citrus fruits, broccoli, cantaloupe, potato, bell pepper, tomato, kiwi, cau- liflower and cabbage. Water: Drink at least eight cups of water a day. Other good liquids are juice, milk, broths, herb teas and soups. Limit your intake of highly caffeinated drinks such as coffee, tea and some sodas to eight ounces a day. Exercise and high temperatures will increase your need for liquids. Learn More For more information on the OB Complete Gold New bEGGin- nings program, which offers advice and solutions customized to your baby's age delivered to your in-box, visit http://bcmpletegld'cm mm licensed contractor Tues. Feb. 7, 2017 Hinton News - 5 In keeping with continued efforts income tax purposes. to save money, the West Virginia Taxpayers who do not have online State Tax Department has ceased access may call the 1099-G and mailing copies of the 1099-G and 1099-1NT Hotline and leave their 1099-1NT statements that the name and address to have a form agency has filed with the Internal mailed to their address. Revenue Service. Taxpayers should call the number Instead, taxpayers may now associated with the first letter of download these statements their last name. electronically through the * A-F: (304) 558-8539 department's secure online portai at * G-M: (304) 558-8540 https://mytaxes.wvtax.gov. Users * N-Z: (304) 558-8541 wlil be required to click the Retrieve Tax Commissioner Dale W. Electronic 10991ink on MyTaxes Steager said the team at the Tax and provide identifying information Department is continuously looking to access the 1099 form they need. for ways to reduce costs and this new A 1099-G form shows the amount effort will save the taxpayers more of refund sent to taxpayers. The than $80,000 in mailing costs. 1099-1NT form is used to report the "With budgetary constraints as amount of interest paid on a refund they are, we strive to find ways to to the taxpayer. The 1099-G is used serve taxpayers in an efficient, cost- by taxpayers who itemize deductions effective manner. Technology is on their federai return and the1099- going to continue to play a 1NT is used to identify additional significant role in our efforts," income that must be reported for Steager said. The people of Portugal and Spain will often eat 12 grapes from a bunch just as the clock strikes 12 midnight on New Year's Eve. This tradition is said to ensure 12 happy months in the coming year. Austin Persinger February is Black History "Month and the Library is a great iy ph~e~0 learn more about the integral role 0fAfrican-Americans in ~ ~.S~istor~,,~:We have bo~s for all ~iges tliai~ celel~rate' the CUlture and~achieve~nents or African-Americans, including seminal works by West Virginia native Henry Louis Gates Jr. We have recently added Coretta Scott King's new memoir My Life, MY Love. My Legacy and Rep. John Lewis' graphic novel memoir March. March is a trilogy and all three books have received positive reviews. Book Three has won several awards including the National Book Award for Young People's Literature, the first graphic novel to win a National Book Award. While geared toward young readers, adults will find the story fascinating as well. The book is recommended for ages 13 and up due to the mature themes and depictions of rather graphic violence. I found the series to be an incredibly enlightening page turner and would personally recommend it to anyone interested in history, civil rights, or democracy. February is also time for our annual Chocolate Lovers Sale featuring amazing chocolate cakes, pies, candy, and more made by the fabulous Friends of the Library. Menus will be delivered around town on Tuesday, February 7 and are also available in the Library. Please order by 2:30 pm, Saturday, February 11. Orders will be available for pickup or delivery on Monday, February 13. Please call the Library at 304-466-4490 for more information or to place your order. The West Virginia Legislature is now in session. Please contact your legislators on behalf of the Summers County Public Library, tell them how important the Library isto you and your community and ask them to maintain current levels of Grants in Aid. Roy Cooper roy.cooper~wvhouse.gov John O'Neal john.oneal~wvhouse.gov Kenny Mann kenny.mann(~wvsenate.gov Ronald Miller ronald.miller~wvsenate.gov These public servants are passionate about working for the people of West Virginia, and they enjoy hearing from their constituents, so please contact them today. I have just received statistics from Dolly Parton's Imagination Library. We have one of the highest rates of participation in the state, with 75% of eligible Summers County children in the program! Imagination Library is a FREE program that will mail any Summers County Child ages birth to five; one book per month: Applications are available at the Library. Keep up to date with the Library by liking us on Facebook or following us on Twitter and Instagram -summerscolibrary. Old Riverview school building Cement mixer, 8 ft. steel frame work table, rotor uller. Antique Furniture, Wicker, Fancy glass, Dining Room. Suit, Bedroom suit, Tools, Lmnel train, 1915 22 rifle, Cedar Gun Cabinet. Call Rick 455-1551 J S~